Why Most Company Website Copy Stinks…And How to Fix It

How do you feel about your company website?

  • Does it reflect your company culture?
  • Does it paint your company in the proper light?
  • Does it detail the products and services you offer?
  • Does it tell your corporate story?
  • Does it convey your corporate mission and vision?
  • Is it visually appealing with a nice layout and great pictures?

Do any of these questions really matter? Candidly, these questions are pretty useless. Yep, I said it. While these are the things that many marketers feel are important, they really aren’t important at all.

Who cares about your vision statement–besides you? Are the pictures that you spent countless hours analyzing really going to make or break a sale? Is the 600 word description of every service and product really needed?

Hell no; that stuff isn’t important!  The only question you should ask is: Am I offering value to my site visitors?

If you’re not offering value to your clients and prospects, then the prettiest picture in the world isn’t going to help.

Here are a few tips to help you adjust your website copy to provide more value:

  • Cut back on the “We’s.”
    Go through your website and take note to how many times you say “We”. We offer better service. We are your one-stop shop. We carry the world’s best widgets. We have an amazing staff. Your website shouldn’t be about you, it should be about them (your target audience). So flip the message around. Instead of saying you offer better service, explain the benefit that your client will receive. For example: Instead of saying: “We offer a 24-hour customer service support line,” rephrase that to say “Get your questions answered immediately from a live person with 24-hour support.” It’s a minor change but it explains the value, not the service.
  • Talk to your clients.
    What you think your clients want and what they really aren’t, don’t always match up! Instead of trying to guess what’s important to your clients, ask them! Then, once you know what’s important to them, emphasis that throughout your website copy.
  • Solve problems.
    The easiest way to sell something is to solve a specific problem they face. So, find out what your prospects biggest problems are, and provide a solution. For example, at SilverRank we don’t just build nice looking websites. Our clients receive more inbound leads because they rank higher in search results and their websites add value to visitors. Our value is solving the problem of being invisible in search rankings.
  • Get beyond the basics.
    Most websites offer an About Us section, Product/Service overviews, contact information and a few more pages. That’s not enough. If you really want to add value then you need a forum to share content, answer questions, provide insight, and educate (just like we’re doing right now on this blog).

So, ask yourself again: How do you feel about your company website?

 

 

 

How do you feel about your company website?

  • Does it reflect your company culture?  
  • Does it paint your company in the proper light? 
  • Does it detail the products and services you offer?
  • Does it tell your corporate story?
  • Does it convey your corporate mission and vision?  
  • Is it visually appealing with a nice layout and great pictures?
Do any of these questions really matter?  Candidly, these questions are pretty useless.  Yep, I said it.  While these are the things that many marketers feel are important, they really aren’t important at all.
Who cares about your vision statement–besides you?  Are the pictures that you spent countless hours analyzing really going to make or break a sale?  Is the 600 word description of every service and product really needed?
Hell no; that stuff isn’t important!  
The only question you should ask is:  Am I offering value to my site visitors?
If you’re not offering value to your clients and prospects, then the prettiest picture in the world isn’t going to help.  
Here are a few tips to help you adjust your website copy to provide more value:
  • Cut back on the “We’s.”
    Go through your website and take note to how many times you say “We”.  We offer better service.  We are your one-stop shop.  We carry the world’s best widgets.  We have an amazing staff.  Your website shouldn’t be about you, it should be about them (your target audience).  So flip the message around.  Instead of saying you offer better service, explain the benefit that your client will receive.  For example: Instead of saying: “We offer a 24-hour customer service support line,” rephrase that to say “Get your questions answered immediately from a live person with 24-hour support.”  It’s a minor change but it explains the value, not the service.
  • Talk to your clients.
    What you think your clients want and what they really aren’t, don’t always match up!  Instead of trying to guess what’s important to your clients, ask them!   Then, once you know what’s important to them, emphasis that throughout your website copy.
  • Solve problems.
    The easiest way to sell something is to solve a specific problem they face.  So, find out what your prospects biggest problems are, and provide a solution.  For example, at SilverRank we don’t just build nice looking websites.  Our clients receive more inbound leads because they rank higher in search results and their websites add value to visitors.  Our value is solving the problem of being invisible in search rankings.
  • Get beyond the basics.
    Most websites offer an About Us section, Product/Service overviews, contact information and a few more pages.  That’s not enough.  If you really want to add value then you need a forum to share content, answer questions, provide insight, and educate (just like we’re doing right now on this blog).

So, ask yourself again: How do you feel about your company website?

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